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    Interesting Facts About the Appalachian Trail

    Appalachian trail

    For over one hundred years, the Appalachian Trail has been a magnet for hikers, nature enthusiasts, and people who are just looking for a good challenge. However, despite the fact that the Appalachian Trail is well-known for being very challenging and long, there are a lot of interesting facts about this trail that many people are unaware of. Here are some of the most interesting facts about the Appalachian Trail.

    It is the World’s Longest Hiking Only Footpath

    The Appalachian Trail is nearly 2,300 miles long. Nowhere on earth is there a longer footpath that only hikers are allowed to. This is remarkable and it just goes to show you how special the Appalachian Trail is.

    The Trail Passes Through 14 States

    Because the trail is so long, it goes through 14 states. The states that the Appalachian Trail passes through are Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

    There are Less Than 15,000 People Who Have Successfully Hiked the Whole Trail

    The Appalachian Trail Conservation keeps a thorough record of everyone who has ever completed the Appalachian Trail. Only 15,000 people have ever hiked the entire thing. This just goes to show you how difficult it is to make it through the entire thing.

    You can Encounter Wild Ponies On the Trail

    There are wild ponies that roam the lands near the trail when it goes through Virginia’s Grayson Highlands State Park. These ponies are very beautiful and have a majestic quality to them. However, don’t get too close because they are wild and not domesticated. So, they can be dangerous.

    The Idea for the Appalachian Trail was Created Atop Stratton Mountain in Vermont

    Nature enthusiast James P. Taylor created the idea for the Appalachian Trail when he was on a hike on Stratton Mountain in Vermont. He dreamed of a trail that stretched all the way across the Eastern United States. His dream came true.

    Image courtesy of Shutterstock

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